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Hotels and Inns

Bibury Court

The Manor House, Bibury Court The Manor House, Bibury Court, was built in its present form by Sir Thomas Sackville, incorporating parts of an earlier building thought to be Tudor. The arms and initials of Sir Thomas Sackville are over the entrance, plus the date 1633. The interior was remodelled in 1759 and again in 1922. The house remained in the Sackville family for several generations, and passed, by marriage of an heiress, to the Warnefords, and in a similar manner to the Cresswells. The house was sold to Lord Sherborne in 1816, and then to Sir Orme Clarke in 1925. It was last used as a private house by Lady Clarke.

Between 1887 and 1915, Bibury Court was occupied by Mr R B Cooper and his family. Mr Cooper kept a diligent photographic record of Bibury during that period, illustrating life in the village and capturing its essence at the turn of this century.

Gates and Drive to Bibury Court

Garden door from the churchyard of St. Mary's to the orchard garden of Bibury Court .

 

Mr Cooper's stagecoach. Note the Sackvile Arms above the entrance to the Court.

Bibury Mill Bridge

Bibury Court became a country house in 1968, now well known as the Bibury Court Hotel. More recently, it was under the ownership of Jane Collier and Andrew and Anne Johnston.

Bibury Court, now a comfortable and informal country house hotel.

Swan Hotel

Petrol pumps at the Swan?

There is a record of an inn existing on the site of The Swan Hotel since the 1600s. The main part of the present building dates from the 1800s, and the large imposing addition dating from the 1930s. The Manor Court was held here, the fate of local felons and villains being duly decided by local or visiting magistrates. Prisoners were held overnight in the lockup next to the Swan, before being carted off to larger jails.

In 1898, the landlord of the Swan was Mr Woodman, later owned by Ushers Brewery.

Bibury Bridge (now known as Swan Bridge), opposite the Swan Hotel, was built in 1770 and stands 346 feet above sea level. Passage across the river before 1770 would have been via a ford.

The Lockup - cold, windowless and stuffy.

The Swan's front garden

The fishing rights on the Coln between Swan Bridge and the Row Bridge were owned in the 1880s by Mr Burge, whose shop - the Saddlers and Harness-makers - stood opposite the end of the Row Bridge. The fishing rights on this stretch later passed to and remain with the Swan Hotel.

From the Row Bridge onward, the fishing rights are owned by the Bibury Court Estate.

 

Bibury Bridge (now known as Swan Bridge), opposite the Swan Hotel, was built in 1770 and stands 346 feet above sea level. Passage across the river before 1770 would have been via a ford.

The approach from The Street. Nearly 30 years after the bridge was built, there are few, if any, maturing trees on the land to the west.

Approaching the bridge and the Swan from Arlington.

The Swan and bridge, before the superb west wing extension. Note how the hotel sign hangs in the reverse position when compared with earlier photographs.

The Swan Hotel today continues to offer the weary (and not so weary) traveller every comfort.

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